Author Topic: Black Locust  (Read 212 times)

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Offline Bakersdozen

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Black Locust
« on: November 25, 2017, 09:50:26 am »
This spring I mail ordered 10 black locust trees.  They arrived looking like sticks attached to bare roots.  I immediately potted them and they flourished.  It looked like a small forest on my driveway.
I donated the best one to the local bee club for a scholarship auction.  It made the club a lot of money  ;D  I am happy to say.
I contacted the city arborist.  I asked for permission to plant some of the trees in the city park that we live adjacent to.  He was excited about the idea and said there weren't very many black locust within the city.  We devised a plan and would plant the trees in November. 
November 22 the city arborist met me in the park and he showed me where I could plant 5 trees.  He flagged the spots and promised that a city employee would be by with mulch and water later that day. 
I planted 3 at one end of the park and two trees at the other end.  The employee came later and mulched and watered my trees.  I am excited about the possibility of a black locust nectar flow.
While we were walking the park, we discovered a water line break.  The park ranger comes by periodically, but it's good that we found it when we did.
Here's a picture of one of my trees after planting.


 I still have 3 small trees to find a spot for.

Offline neillsayers

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Re: Black Locust
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2017, 12:36:26 pm »
When they do bloom, they are quite beautiful. :)
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Offline brooksbeefarm

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Re: Black Locust
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2017, 04:54:14 pm »
Fore a hard wood they grow fast and will bloom in about 3 to 4 years and the blooms have a nice sweet smell. They are aggressive and will have to control them or you will be living in a forest. I dig them up and give to other beekeepers or plant then other places. Jack
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Offline Perry

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Re: Black Locust
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2017, 07:50:51 pm »
I always admire folks that plant trees of almost any kind. It takes great vision to do something that doesn't provide immediate gratification these days. When I drive down a beautiful tree lined driveway with big old trees on either side I am often reminded of somebodies vision, someone most likely no longer with us, but someone who looked into the future.
"It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor."      
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Black Locust
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2017, 09:06:32 pm »
Thanks for the bloom information, Jack.  I wasn't sure how long I would have to wait.
As the arborist and I walked around, I commented on the location for the 3 trees in the south side of the park.  I stated that they will give a pleasant scent to those in the park when a southerly breeze blows.  He said that hadn't occurred to him.  He had an injury to his nose in the past and can't hardly smell.  He thanked me for mentioning that since he hadn't thought of that.

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Black Locust
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2017, 09:08:45 pm »
I always admire folks that plant trees of almost any kind. It takes great vision to do something that doesn't provide immediate gratification these days. When I drive down a beautiful tree lined driveway with big old trees on either side I am often reminded of somebodies vision, someone most likely no longer with us, but someone who looked into the future.
I believe the says goes like this, "The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago.  The second best time is now."