Author Topic: Herbicide drift question  (Read 510 times)

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Offline Bakersdozen

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Herbicide drift question
« on: August 15, 2022, 12:02:31 pm »
A new beekeeping family asked me a question about herbicide drift and now I am wondering if I gave the best answer.  I have been lucky and have never had colony exposure to pesticide or herbicide spraying.
The mother, in this family, is highly allergic to poison ivy.  There is poison ivy that keeps popping back, around the hive, after repeated attempts to take care of it without using herbicide.  Being desperate they are going to spray weed killer.  I suggested spraying very early or very late in the day and drape an old, wet sheet over the hive until the weed killer dries.  Is there better advice I could have given?

Online The15thMember

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2022, 01:26:01 pm »
We had some huge poison ivy vines in our goat pasture that just needed to go, and what my sister did was she actually cut the vines close to the base and then painted the stumps that remained with herbicide using a disposable paintbrush.  She did something similar with some rhododendron stumps that kept sprouting out, but she used stump killer for those.  It's been quite successful, and without actually spraying, there is no risk of drift.  I'm not sure if something like this would work in their situation, for example if the poison ivy is young and small and just keeps pupping up a few leaves here and there, then it's probably not an applicable strategy, but painting on the whole is always safer than spraying if you can.  I think the rest of your advice was spot on.   
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Offline Jen

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2022, 01:16:43 am »
15th... I think that sounds like a good idea  :)
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2022, 02:31:36 pm »
That's a good idea 15th.  Unfortunately, I think the Mom is so allergic that she is vulnerable to an outbreak from handling exposed clothing in the laundry and just being in close proximity to the plant.  It means a trip to the doctor or urgent care for her to get relief.  I think they hope to let it wither in place.  I think I should have told them to pick a cool day and screen the bees in place in addition to throwing a sheet over the colony.  The sheet would block the airborne particles from entering the hive.  The screen would keep the bees inside.

Offline Jen

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2022, 06:40:28 pm »
Also a good idea Baker  :)
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Offline iddee

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2022, 06:59:01 pm »
Tell her to call a pro and ask what herbicide to use.
I walked out to the guys spraying for the local power company under the power lines. As soon as I got to them, one walked over to me and said, "I see your bees. Don't worry, we are spraying a herbicide only. It doesn't bother insects."
“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2022, 11:09:18 am »
A quick online search says that Atrazine and 2,4D are safe around honey bees.  Interesting.

Offline LazyBkpr

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2023, 09:55:03 am »
Yeah a lot of things are considered SAFE around honeybees, until you start mixing those things together inside the hive....   ANYHOW... We have a shed in Texas, that was COVERED with poison ivy?  Vines? Poison Oak? Whatever it was.. it made me itch in places I don't care to admit...     I mixed two gallons of vinegar with a bottle of dish soap, and POURED it around the shed...     A year and a half later nothing is growing where I poured that stuff....

What herbicide is safer than Roundup?
Organic Roundup alternatives include herbicidal soaps that use fatty acids to kill weeds and industrial vinegar, which contains much higher levels of acetic acid than what you have in your kitchen. Acid-based herbicides burn down some young weeds. Corn gluten meal can kill grass weeds and broadleaf weeds.

   NOW, having said that?  I spray herbicide...  {Glyphosate}  Around my hives to kill the grass and weeds.   I ALSO, now, set my hives on top of plastic pallets, so I don't accidentally spray the HIVE with the herbicide.
   MANY of my hives, are placed on fence rows, and surrounded by corn and beans. They get sprayed with whatever the corn and beans get sprayed with. In this situation, I have to make sure I rotate the comb... It is recommended, every five years, to get rid of the buildup of those diverse chemicals that WILL build up in the wax, and cause problems.
       I know this topic is old but I wanted to reply for future seekers of information!    Scott
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Offline iddee

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2023, 05:33:56 am »
Myself, and I'm sure others, need details. How strong? It comes in 30, 45, 75, and maybe other strengths. Also what dispense rate.
“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
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Offline LazyBkpr

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Re: Herbicide drift question
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2023, 11:01:18 pm »
The glyphosate I use is from Tractor supply. I buy the three or four gallon container? I will have to look at it, maybe take a picture.... I mix it according to the directions for weeds and grass in the sprayer I have on my cart. Then I just,, soak everything I want to die. I have to do it once a year in the spring. I also spray it along the fence lines, around the shed and Shop.  I have Knives to make, so I'll be in the shop the next few days, I'll dig the jug out and get more information.
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