Author Topic: Leave your garden messy  (Read 2223 times)

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Offline Bakersdozen

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Leave your garden messy
« on: February 04, 2016, 09:40:44 am »
I will add this to the "Learn something new everyday category".  I thought I would share.  In a facebook posting, by Prairie Moon Nursery, entitled "Got Stems?", I learned that native bees lay eggs in the stems of native flowers.   :o  Gardeners should leave their natives in place through the winter, not only for the birds but the bees as well.  I always leave my messy stems up through March (sometimes later) for the birds.  I would think they need to stay in place until the native bees start to emerge.  I am not sure when that is in my area. This calls for more research.
Here's to a messy garden! :occasion14: 



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Gypsi

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2016, 11:25:34 am »
In my area wild mason bees hatch in late April early May
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Offline Perry

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2016, 03:34:04 pm »
Here's to a messy garden! :occasion14: 

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: I think a lot of folks would raise a glass to that! :D
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Offline Jen

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2016, 03:50:28 pm »
My mom raised us kids to have the yard spic and span at all times and especially before winter set in. That's been a hard rule for me to break. But this year Iddee (I think) posted this conversation with God about how we are supposed to leave the leaves on the ground over the winter, so the nutrients replenish the earth. Now, I always known this, but this last Fall season, that post with God and leaving the Fall mess helped me walk away from raking up and pruning the yard until Spring  ;D
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Gypsi

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2016, 09:17:53 pm »
I have a very messy garden. I have wildflowers in the broccoli and cabbage patch and onions in the sweetpotato bed and bermuda grass has taken over the asparagus bed and is working on the blackberries too.


Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 10:11:03 am »
In Kansas, the ranchers in the Flint Hills do a controlled burn of the prairie.  This takes place in early April.  I wonder what effect that has on native bees that lay eggs in stems?
http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/04/28/306227655/fire-setting-ranchers-have-burning-desire-to-save-tallgrass-prairie

Now, when I look at my brown back yard, I see stems of grasses, Helianthus, Echinacea and so forth.  I wonder what is hiding in those stems waiting for warm weather.  By spring, so many of those stems are hollow tubes.

Offline brooksbeefarm

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2016, 11:43:03 am »
He, he, he, although there's alot of truth in what iddee said, BUT, i think he has found a way of getting out of raking the leaves. :laugh: Jack

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2016, 10:17:58 am »
I attended a conference this weekend sponsored by the Audubon of Kansas.  A speaker from the Xerces society touched on this topic. 
There are approximately 3600 species of native bees in the US.  70% of those nest underground.  Bare spots in our yards are essential for nesting sites.  (Don't mulch everything)  30% nest in tunnels or hollow stems.  Hollow stems of the box elder, cane fruit and elderberry are used.
45 species of bumblebees nest in existing cavities.
25% of bumbles are at risk for extinction. 
Pollinators need: 1. Food 2. Shelter 3. Protection from pesticides
We can:  1. Provide natural habitat 2. Support habitat complexity 3. Protect natural areas 4. Create new habitat

Offline Les

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2017, 09:53:14 pm »
Good time of year to roll this post back up.  The growing season is winding down, don't forget the pollinators that need to find a place to hole up for the winter.  I also don't deadhead any flowers that have seedheads, so the birds will have forage.  I end up with many "volunteers" in the Spring but I pot them up in the Fall and put them out on my lawn with a free sign......they don't last long.  There is a method to my madness, getting people to plant perennials as a nectar source for the bees  C:-)

Offline neillsayers

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Re: Leave your garden messy
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2017, 11:06:57 pm »
I guess my garden is a haven for these little guys. It gets cleaned up right before planting time.
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