Author Topic: Queen Cell Identification  (Read 5836 times)

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Offline riverbee

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Queen Cell Identification
« on: December 11, 2013, 03:12:37 pm »
this pdf file is an excellent comprehensive reference for any beginning beekeeper.  there will be many new beeks coming here, and in the spring and summer season we all will be answering questions relative to the queen cells present on frames.  i have attached the pdf file and also the link to a pdf file to help you identify what type of queen cell you have on your frames; color photographs, where they are located, why they are there, with descriptions, differences, and recommended course of action /non action, and other informative valuable information:   

An intro to the pdf file:

“Hive Diagnosis
 Before you contemplate any management of a colony that has developed queen cells you have to understand what is going on - what stage in the swarming process has the colony reached? All the information you need to make this diagnosis is ‘written’ there on the (brood) combs and to a lesser extent the bees. But before you make this diagnosis you have to know how to the ‘read’ the combs - what you are looking at and what else you need to look for. To be able to do this effectively you must have a basic knowledge of honey bee biology and behavior."


    Types of Queen Cell
    There are three different types of queen cell:-
    1) Swarm cells
    2) Supersedure cells, and
    3) Emergency cells

It is important to be able to correctly identify the three types of queen cell (see also Figures 1-3) Only the presence of swarm cells means that the colony is intent on swarming. The other two types are there for entirely different reasons and this does NOT include any intention to swarm. Supersedure and emergency queen cells do not usually require any intervention from the beekeeper - except to leave the bees strictly alone and let them get on with it. So, how do you tell the difference between the three types?”


Hope this helps!   Happy reading what is ‘written’ on your frames!

there are queen cells in my hive pdf:

There Are Queen Cells In My Hive-What Should I Do?
« Last Edit: December 23, 2013, 12:47:34 am by riverbee »
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Offline LazyBkpr

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 03:43:53 pm »
Good reading!! Thank you!!
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Offline Perry

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 06:25:58 pm »
Almost something I would want in my favourites.
Good stuff.
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Offline tecumseh

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 06:41:31 am »
the down load worked fine on this one....

lot of good what if question concerning queenlessness at the end of the article.  I would argue with the author's description of superscedure cells  (not quite accurate).  the first picture in the download is a great example of how I often look for queen cells in the primary swarm season < that is you do not really need to take the hive totally apart but simply look at bottom bars towards the top of the brood nest.... quite often I simple break the hive apart here and take a quick look at the bottom bars.... not 100% reliable but then again what is?

Offline riverbee

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2015, 06:22:14 pm »
i wanted to bump this thread up in the line......swarm season is upon many of us! also, many of us will be ordering package bees and nucs, and also dividing and requeening hives. swarm cells will develop, as will supersedure cells and emergency cells.  swarm cells will be being built and present in the spring for any colony over 1 year old. with package bees, there is always a high probability that one will experience a supersedure, and sometimes with requeening.  this guide is just another tool to help you determine the differences of the different types of queen cells.  when you see cells present in the hive and are still unsure, snap a pic, post it, or describe it, most of us can tell you what it is or isn't.  (go to the first post for the pdf file and link to this guide).

enjoy your spring! enjoy your bees!
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Offline brooksbeefarm

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2015, 12:03:45 am »
Good one Mrs. rb, the bees are flying, temps. in the upper 50's and sixties, snow is gone and the sun is shining :). Maybe now we can start talking bees and you, perry and mammy, will stop picking on me. ;) Jack

Offline kebee

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2015, 05:36:24 am »
 Love the article riverbee, gave me some insight on what the bees are up to, saved it in my doc.

Ken

Offline Newbee

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2018, 08:33:03 am »
Fantastic article. Very useful.
Thanks for sharing!

- K

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Queen Cell Identification
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2019, 09:07:29 am »
 


there are queen cells in my hive pdf:

There Are Queen Cells In My Hive-What Should I Do?

This link is no longer good.  The website has some excellent reading though.