Author Topic: Crock pot crow.  (Read 3290 times)

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Offline Alleyyooper

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Crock pot crow.
« on: August 18, 2015, 12:19:41 pm »

Ingredients
 12 - 16 pieces of crow breast meat (no bones) (6 - 8 crows)
 2 cups barbecue sauce
 1 cup water
 1/3 cup of brown sugar
 1/3 cup of chopped onions
 1/3 cup of chopped green peppers
 salt and black pepper to taste

Preparation
 Shred crow breasts into as small pieces as possible. Add to crock pot with all other ingredients. Cook in crock pot for 6 hours on low. Serve over rolls or bread. Makes 4 servings

 ;D   Al
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Offline brooksbeefarm

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2015, 12:52:51 pm »
I'm retired, I don't have to eat Crow no more  :D. It does sound good though.Jack

Offline Mikey N.C.

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2015, 06:24:16 pm »
Do ya leave the birdshot in for gunpowder flavor  :laugh:

Offline lazy shooter

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2015, 07:02:47 pm »
Hey Alleyooper, have you ever eaten beef or chicken?  :):):)

Offline neillsayers

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2015, 08:06:58 pm »
Being happily married I eat it on a regular basis.  :) This recipe might make it more palatable.
Neill Sayers
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Offline Jen

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2015, 01:56:06 am »
Hey Alleyyooper ~ Need pics of all these recipes you post. I don't try a recipe unless I see a picture of it first ~
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Offline Alleyyooper

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2015, 05:24:33 am »
Bird shot!!!!! How would bird shot get in my crows? I use a 220 swift mostly but some times a 22 mag or 22lr.

Some things I don't take pictures of Dead coyotes, crows, skunks possums, and coons to start with.

 :)  Al
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Offline lazy shooter

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2015, 09:25:23 am »
Alleyooper:

I swear we must be soul mates.  You are the only other person I know that shoots a .220 Swift.  I own two of them, and have shot one of them since the late 60's. 

Below is my favorite .220 story.

"Since I reload, it is necessary to buy shell casing.  So I ventured into a large East Texas sporting goods store because they had advertised that they were the leading supplier of reloading accessories in deep East Texas.  When I entered the store there was a lady stocking some shelves and one man behind the cash register counter.  The lady walked up to me and asked; "Can I help you find something."  I replied that yes, "I was looking to purchase 100 rounds of .220 Swift brass."  She then yelled, "honey he is here."  It seemed her husband has ordered the brass when they opened the store, and he had ordered 100 rounds of .220 Swift brass.  He had always told her that; "one day a man will show up and buy some of this brass."  It was an inside joke with them.  In the several years they had been open that man had not come.  The woman has teased that they would always have that brass.  Apparently, there aren't many of us that shoot a .220 Swift.  It is a cartridge that I have loved since boyhood, and that's been a while."   

All of the above said, I need to go to the ranch and reload some .220 brass.  I shoot a 55 grain Ballistic Tip Bullet from Nosler over a good bit of 4350 IMR powder and light them up with Federal Premium primers.  It's a great rifle cartridge.

Offline lazy shooter

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2015, 09:32:41 am »
Alleyooper:

I swear we must be soul mates.  You are the only other person I know that shoots a .220 Swift.  I own two of them, and have shot one of them since the late 60's. 

Below is my favorite .220 story.

"Since I reload, it is necessary to buy shell casing.  So I ventured into a large East Texas sporting goods store because they had advertised that they were the leading supplier of reloading accessories in deep East Texas.  When I entered the store there was a lady stocking some shelves and one man behind the cash register counter.  The lady walked up to me and asked; "Can I help you find something."  I replied that yes, "I was looking to purchase 100 rounds of .220 Swift brass."  She then yelled, "honey he is here."  It seemed her husband has ordered the brass when they opened the store, and he had ordered 100 rounds of .220 Swift brass.  He had always told her that; "one day a man will show up and buy some of this brass."  It was an inside joke with them.  In the several years they had been open that man had not come.  The woman has teased that they would always have that brass.  Apparently, there aren't many of us that shoot a .220 Swift.  It is a cartridge that I have loved since boyhood, and that's been a while."   

All of the above said, I need to go to the ranch and reload some .220 brass.  I shoot a 55 grain Ballistic Tip Bullet from Nosler over a good bit of 4350 IMR powder and light them up with Federal Premium primers.  It's a great rifle cartridge.

Offline LazyBkpr

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2015, 09:37:14 am »
Crow...

   I used to raise and train English Spring Spaniels...  thats how we met George and Barbara Bush (Another story) But, I decided to take my prize Spaniel on a crow calling hunt one afternoon...   My buddy already had everything set up... so we settled in to wait with the caller going, my fav dog beside me... the crows started showing up. we waited a bit, let more come in...  then stood and started shooting..
   My champion Spaniel SPRANG into action, tearing across the field to where the first bird dropped.. He grabbed it and spun around and started back at a dead run.....  then while still trying to slide to a stop, he spat the bird out.... tried to pick it up, and spat it out again..  snorted sniffed, snorted some more, the n tured and ran to the next bird, grabbed it, and immediately spat it out....  he sniffed it, and BACKED away from it, ran to a third bird, snorting and shaking his head, while he tried to get feathers out of his mouth.. go to the third bird... stretched his neck out and sniffed it, then turned and walked back to me... looked at me with a look of pure disgust, and curled up on the ground, still occasionally snorting and shaking his head.....
   At that point... I figured if a dog that LIVED to retrieve birds wouldnt even pick one up, I wasnt  going to eat one!   Leastways, until I got a lot hungrier than I was.
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Offline Alleyyooper

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2015, 06:18:43 am »
Two rifle calibers I have always since I was old enough to read out door magazines has been a 220 swift and a 257 Roberts.
I was starting to buy up supply's for my retirement, and the 220 swift was high on my list. this is before the well our internet experiences about 1994. I called and drove to gun shops 200 & 300 miles away to look at rifles. Most were Remington 700's with the bull barrels, not what I was looking for and one place who said they had a 220 swift in there stock indeed did a Ruger number 1 Also not what I was looking for. One day at work one of the guys was telling about his wife locking her keys in her car and having to call a lock smith to open it up for her. She said he showed up in a truck and there were several rifles in the back so she asked him about them. He told her they were for his side business of selling guns and reloading supplies.
I called him the next day and ended up with a Ruger 77 220 swift medium weight barrel, just what I was looking for at a very good price. I ordered brass from Williams gun sight company which is near me. Went to a gun show and bought a used Redding set of dies to reload them, a 6x24 scope and mounts.
I don't remember the charge but load a charge of IMR 4064 over CCI rifle primers and was loading Hornady 55gr. A max bullets. They don't make the A Max any longer it seems so I am going to switch to 55gr Sierra HPBT game kings. I use the 85gr HPBT game kings in my 243 and love them.

Took me almost 7 years to find some one who knew how to adjust the screws in the Ruger's trigger down to 2.5 pounds from the 6 and a half tons factory setting. Yes it is one of the rare 77's with the 3 screw adjustment trigger.
Never did get a 257 Roberts, Am all around it with the 243 on the low side and the 7mm08 on the high side. 

 ;D   Al
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Offline lazy shooter

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2015, 07:41:09 am »
Al:

We grew up in the same era.  Ned Roberts, the father of the .257 Roberts was one of my favorite writers.  Back in the late 80's Remington was building a Classic Rifle each year.  It was a different caliber each year and would never be rebuilt.  The Classic was a straight stock with medium barrel and a cheek piece.  I bought one back then and still shoot it.  I love the .257 Roberts.  Mine has a 4X12 Leopold scope on it and shoots very well.  I had a gunsmith pillar bed the action and front locking lug with glass and do a trigger job on it.  It shoots lights out!  The other caliber I love, and I bet you do also, is the .270 Winchester.  It was Jack O'Connor's baby.  He was one of THE gun writers of the last 40's and 50's.

Hey, it's good to know that there are other old guys out there that haven't been caught up in the new, short magnum cartridges.  It's also good to know that there is still someone besides myself that reloads cartridges.  Those writers and experimenters of old were better than the youngsters think.  Good on you Al.

Lazy

Offline Alleyyooper

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2015, 05:34:04 am »
Yup I read about all those magical cartridges back in the day. But growing up in northern Michigan where nearly all the woods had been clear cut in the 1950's and had grown back as thick as grass in a lawn we were taught a round like the 270 was some thing for those hunting the west. For us it was those huge pumpkin rounds like the 35 Remington, so called brush busters like the 30 30 and 32 Winchester special.
My dad used to buy 30 30 rounds from a guy he worked with who reloaded in the late 50's early 60's. I started doing my own in early 1970's and bought my first and very last auto loader rifle a Winchester model 100 in 308. My brother had one too, which blew up on him I picked up 173 different pieces of it while our folks rushed him to the hospital.
Remember the recall on them? Figured that is what happened to his rifle the firing pin broke hung out of the bolt and we were shooting single drop in rounds. Figure he dropped his round in and release the bolt and before the bolt could lock the pin fired the primer allowing to the bolt to slam back and release all that energy into the rest of the rifle. 
I was afraid to shoot my auto loader after that and got a bolt action Remington 700 in 243.
That started my love affair with Remington 700's. I have two 700 muzzle loaders a 54 and 50 cal, 243, 308, 7mm08 300 win mag. Some day I will find a 700 in 308, 243, used enoughI won't feel badly about barreling with a 22 cal barrel and have a wild cat 22 center fire based off the 308 case Cheetah I think they are called.

 ;D  Al
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Offline lazy shooter

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2015, 07:37:37 am »
Al:

I've never owned a muzzle loader.  I shoot black powder cartridge rifles and have three Shiloh Sharps rifles calibered in 45-70, 45-90 and the famous Quigley 45-110.  I have an original 45.70 C. Sharps.  It is my favorite BPCR.  I use it to dispatch feral pigs.

A .308 necked down to a .22 barrel seems like a fun gun.  The .308 family of cartridges are all efficient and accurate.  I'm going to study up on the Cheetah.

Back to the original thread, where did you ever learn to eat all the different animals.  I consider myself to be somewhat of a forager, but I have never eaten crow or coyote.  The native Indians thought dog meat was a delicacy, so a coyote would have been tasty to them.  Did you inherit these recipes, or did you learn from experimentation?

There are endless amounts of crows in East Texas, but where I live there are very few crows.  So few, that I only see them a couple of times a year.

You're one of the fellows that I wish lived closer. 

lazy

Offline Alleyyooper

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Re: Crock pot crow.
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2015, 06:21:39 am »
My dad was not a big hunter of fisher man but I had uncles on my moms side that were. I was real young when they would tell me to not be going to shot stuff you don't intend on eating. It is just a wasteful habit to get into shooting is a waste of powder and shot and a waste of a critter not going to be ate.

Well the crow recipe is a real old family one handed down from the depression era I was told. Cooked very slow on the old wood burning range great grandma had, when if you wanted meat to eat you ate what you could shoot. I have modified several recipes to crock pot cooked slow.

The coyote recipes crock pot one any way was From a old Indian Yooper trapper who lives near my UP deer camp. I enjoyed his company when I was there deer hunting. He passed in 2006.

Some I have found on back woods web sites.

:D  Al
your not fully dressed with out a smile.