Author Topic: feeders  (Read 4369 times)

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Offline mamapoppybee

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feeders
« on: January 09, 2014, 05:09:51 pm »
trying to figure out if have diffrent types of feeders matter? If so what are the types and uses for them?

Offline Perry

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Re: feeders
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 07:02:52 am »
Lots of choices:
Entrance = never used them so little to say. Watch for robbing.
Hive top = good but can be expensive. Watch for drowning.
Jars over innercover = cheap (usually free) but requires empty super around them. Various sizes available obviously.
Bucket = I use these, they can hold 1 to 2.5 gallons, requiring fewer visits. Hard to tell syrup level. Exposed to bees when filling. Requires empty super.
Specialty types with various advantages and faults. (last 2 pics) No exposure, no drowning, only holds a half gallon. Requires empty super.
I am sure there are others.




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Offline tecumseh

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Re: feeders
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 07:17:08 am »
my favorite is a frame feeder < you may experience some drowning in these but even this sometimes tells you quite a lot.

the most simple feeder is a hole cut into one of my migratory lids with a quart jar inserted into the hole and three to 5 small holes punched into the lid < in hotter weather you do need to cover the glass to keep the heat from building up internal in the jar < I typically use a plastic half gallon planting container turned up side down over the jar.

I have long suggested to folks that entrance feeder is the world worst joke on the new beekeeper. 

Offline Walt B

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Re: feeders
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2014, 08:27:16 am »
I use a jar with holes in the lid. Started with top feeders but lost too much syrup to evaporation plus, as Perry said, there can be a problem with drowning. I found the top feeders not consistent in quality.

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Offline Riverrat

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Re: feeders
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2014, 10:27:02 am »
gallon pickle jar inverted over the inner cover from walmart $3.99. Bonus you get to eat the pickles. ;)
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Offline apisbees

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Re: feeders
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2014, 11:27:57 am »
Have used all but the entrance feeder, strong hive with lots of bees hive top or frame and the bees can take the trip to the feeder. small clusters jar or pail so the feed holes of syrup are on/over the cluster. Hive top and Masonite built frame feeders can leak if not built and sealed proper and can develop leaks over time if not stored proper. Most are sealed with wax and the heat of direct sun well melt the wax.
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Offline riverbee

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Re: feeders
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2014, 05:58:19 pm »
great thread to start mama! so all can learn about the different types of feeders.  some of this will be regional for all of us, and to some degree a personal preference, or what works for us in our areas.

because i am in the north cold country, like perry i use the buckets over the inner cover. these are fool proof and right over the bees, unless you forget to check it for leaks.  i don't like the boardman feeders, this causes too many problems for me with pests and robbing.  the only time i use boardman feeders is to place water on a hive, a new divide, or a nuc, works great for this.

ps the boardman feeders are what the other beeks are referring to as an 'entrance feeder'.
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Offline mamapoppybee

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Re: feeders
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2014, 10:25:31 am »
are the  boardman feeders what most us to supplement water to the bees in the hotter part of summer?



this is the top feed from mann lake that im looking at getting.

Offline riverbee

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Re: feeders
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2014, 01:52:57 pm »
yes, boardmans are quart jars that set in a plastic base and set in the entrance of the hive.
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Offline Marty68

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Re: feeders
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2014, 02:00:48 pm »
i use the entrance feeders also. in the 6 months that i've used them only had a dozen drown. otherwise i use the inner cover to do it in the winter time.

Offline crazy8days

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Re: feeders
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2014, 02:14:31 pm »
I use the 1 gal pickle jars.  Easy to see if they are low. But, only hold 1 gal.  Home Depot in the paint section have regular 2 gal. buckets with lids.  Started to use them.  But, you can't see when they get low.  I don't mind filling them on a good warm day.  I did this fall fill after 2 days of rain on a cloudy, windy day.  Well, bad move on my part! :o :o :o
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Offline Slowmodem

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Re: feeders
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2014, 03:14:06 pm »
are the  boardman feeders what most us to supplement water to the bees in the hotter part of summer?



this is the top feed from mann lake that im looking at getting.

That's exactly the feeders I have.  I had to run a line of silicone around the screen to keep the bees out of the syrup.



Also, I have to run them above the inner cover, because they will build comb and lay eggs under the feeder if you do not.



Other than that, I'm very pleased with them.  They will hold several gallons of syrup.

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Offline mamapoppybee

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Re: feeders
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2014, 04:12:40 pm »
slowmow ty for the pics and tips really helps lots

Offline BoilerJim

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Re: feeders
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2014, 04:24:33 pm »
I am on a swarm call list and a couple of year ago I got overwhelmed with calls that I did not have enough feeders, frames etc and went into  using whatever I could get my hands on. I ended up using jars due to they were so easily available.

You can't go wrong with any feeder IMHO (other than entrance feeders - robbing). It is what feels right for YOU. That "feeling" is different for each of us. I would experiment with several to see what suits your fancy.  ;)
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Offline tecumseh

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Re: feeders
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2014, 04:48:34 pm »
the one option I believe that has been missed is the lowly baggie feeder.  for this you need a ziploc freezer baggie (the gallon size works nicely), an empty shell (hive body or some dimension), syrup of course and a fork.  fill the bag about 3/4 full with syrup and seal the bag.  while holding the top of the freezer bag take the fork and punch the baggie two times at about the logo.  place directly on top of the frames just above the primary cluster and then add the empty shell to cover the baggie.  use the palm of your hand to squeeze out any air until just just a bit of syrup trickles out from the points where you punctured the bag.  you can also use smaller bags and I have suggested to at least one tbh beekeeper here that this could be a good feeding method for a tbh.