Author Topic: What I am currently reading  (Read 4287 times)

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Offline Bakersdozen

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What I am currently reading
« on: June 26, 2016, 10:34:14 am »
I think this thread has several possibilities.  It can all be about what I am reading right now, or others can chime in about what's on their bed side table these days.  I hope others chime in because that will be a lot more interesting.

I am currently reading Bringing Nature Home, How you can sustain wildlife with native plants by Douglas W. Tallamy.  This author was recommended to me by a fellow beekeeper and gardener.  Reading is not a priority for me in summer, so I am not very far along.  Tallamy's reoccurring theme focuses on man's disruption of natural habitats and how we need to learn to diversify our environment before we lose species because there is no where for them to go.  Tallamy stresses than "pockets" of native plant species, while it helps, are not enough to support all the species that share our world.  Think of all the little bogs and ponds that were filled in for subdivisions. 
I think readers will realize that the plant species we add to our landscapes have an impact on insects, birds, amphibians, etc.  It might make you want to go out and over seed your pristine fescue yard with white clover!

Offline neillsayers

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2016, 12:30:47 pm »
B12,

That is so right on. Species diversity is key to a healthy environment. I read something Sam Comfort said calling monocultural areas "agricultural deserts". Everything in our ecology and even our reproduction systems is designed to increase genetic diversity. Thanks for bringing this topic up. Look forward to discussion. :)
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Offline Jen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2016, 12:49:26 pm »
I am reading 'H is for Hawk' by Helen Macdonald. A true story about a woman who was always interested in falconry. Except she went against the advice of other falconers who warned against training a Goshawk, a more difficult hawk to train, encouraging her to train the more congenial peregrine hawk. She chose the Goshawk. Reflections of myself, often choosing the more difficult road.
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Offline brooksbeefarm

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2016, 01:06:20 pm »
I have many trees and plants i have planted and care for that are bee and butterfly friendly and had to spray insecticide on all that was not in bloom :sad:. The Japanese beetles are here by the thousands eating fruit trees (leaves and fruit) grape vine leaves, shrubs,most everything in the garden, and flowers. I use Asana insecticide and spray just before dark and so far over the years i've not had a bee kill using it. I've never seen this many of them before, more like millions than thousands? I guess i'm a little sick ;D i like to set and watch them twist, turn , and fall of graveyard dead on the ground after i spray them dirty devil's :laugh: Are any of you having problems with them?? Jack

Offline kebee

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2016, 02:29:32 pm »
 Yes they are bad here also, as much as I hate too I am going to have to spray to kill them, I think it is the hot humid weather causing them to multiply so much.

Ken

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2016, 02:35:35 pm »
I have been working in the yard.  I just cut out my 2 knock out rose bushes.  I decided they add NOTHING to the diversity of my yard.  The native cup plants and ironweed that are trying to sprout around them will have more room to grow.  Breaks over! Now back to work. 
Jack: No Japanese beetles here.  I guess I don't have anything they like.

Offline neillsayers

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2016, 12:01:20 am »
Japanese beetles are getting worse here every year. I suspect even the chickens won't eat them
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Offline Les

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2016, 08:26:37 am »
I agree about the knock out roses.  I planted one a few years ago and also find it adds nothing as far as food for the bees and butterflies.  The only critter that likes it is some type of caterpillar that decimates the leaves and then it looks so unsightly.  My neighbor wants it so once our heat and dry spell ends, I am digging it out.
I receive this little publication titled "Green Prints".  It is a small magazine that is published independently by a gentlemen and his family.  It consists of gardening/life stories that range from heartfelt to funny.  The stories are submitted by freelance writers.  The artwork on the covers is so beautiful that my plan one day is to make a framed collage of my favorite covers.  These magazines are keepers and I have saved them for years.  In the dead of winter, I enjoy pulling out old copies and re-reading them.
I added an image of the Spring edition's cover and a photo of where you can subscribe if interested.





Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2016, 08:55:58 am »
Jen, falconry?  That's an unusual subject.  But beekeeping is unusual too!

Les, that is a beautiful picture on the cover.  I like the by line "The Weeder's Reader".  That's cute.

Neil, I haven't heard of Sam Comfort.  I will have to Google him.

Offline neillsayers

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2016, 09:38:56 am »
B12,

Sam Comfort is an interesting and a little eccentric beekeeper. His operation is called Anarchy Apiaries. He has many talks on You Tube.
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Offline LazyBkpr

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2016, 02:43:13 am »
IIRC Sam runs long hives up and down the east coast?
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2016, 12:08:25 pm »
My husband came home with some reference material that he was very proud of.  He found this at a book sale.  It had been library reference material.  The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture by L.H. Bailey, 1935.  There are 3 volumes, each averaging 1200 pgs.  Each volume weighs a ton.  The best part...no common names here!  It's all listed in Latin. 
It seems that Bailey was quite the expert, in his day.

Offline riverbee

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2016, 12:05:42 am »
hmmm let me see...reading.......bedside table.......

some material from prairie restoration (on our restoration)
abj and bee culture probably back to april.....could be further back.......not sayin'.............. :D
a manual on my canon g 16 camera from the last time i looked something up..... :D
wisconsin dnr magazine. 2 of them (these are pretty cool) 
a non fiction book on fly fishing.....tales and stories of the madison river ( a series)

and the latest.........BLUE SKY BEE SUPPLY magazine........... :D

might have something else.......... :D
i don't really get much reading done in summer months sometimes.

great thread baker's, interested in others replies and/or what's on everyone's list for the upcoming colder weather! 

me?  i will be catching up on all the above and whatever else gets added!............ :D



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Offline neillsayers

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2016, 12:14:33 am »
Been catching up on Randy Oliver's articles in ABJ
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2016, 08:24:28 am »
Been catching up on Randy Oliver's articles in ABJ
Good choice!

Offline lazy shooter

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2016, 09:52:35 am »
I don't read much.  I don't sign my name.  I make a mark.  :)

I really don't read much about bio sciences, including bees.  I love them, I just don't like bio science.  I'm a physical science guy. 

Having stated the above, I do consider myself a naturalist.  Our ranch is includes approximately 600 acres of virgin timber and brush.  It is mostly rocky with some large live oak and mesquite trees.  There is also a lot of prickly pear cactus and bee brush.  I see people advertising cactus honey, but I do not see bees foraging on cactus blooms.  Bee brush or white brush is one of the best bee foraging plants I have seen.  It blooms after all of the significant summer rains.  In my opinion, It is the best smelling flower of them all.

Finally, about reading:  When I purchased our last ranch, I ordered literature from the state game and fish commission about natural plants for cattle and wildlife.  I wanted to know what to plant.  Three different publications said before planting to try fallow plowing.  Fallow plowing is simply deep plowing land, eight-inches or deeper and leaving it alone.  I used a chisel plow and broke up about 10-inches of soil and left the land in large clumps of soil.  By doing this the sun shines deeper into the soil and helps to germinate seeds that may be DECADES old.  The first year after fallow plowing there was an abundance of sunflowers, side oats gramma, native bluestem, verbena and many other native weeds and grasses.  I continue to fallow plow my land every two years and the forage for cattle, bees and birds gets better and better. 

If you have some vacant land you might try this.  It has been an economical and foraging success.  I fallow plow half of my 200 acres of pasture each year in January or February. 

My land had been over grazed for decades, and the fallow plowing greatly enhanced the grazing for cattle.  In addition there is a lot of flowering weeds for the bees, and our native sunflowers draw the small song birds like honey does to bees.  The sunflowers are also good feed for dove, quail and turkey.  Maybe you can convince a neighbor with poor cattle pastures to try this.  It is an inexpensive way to improve pastures.  The cost per acre is probably less than $15.00.

lazy

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2016, 08:45:43 am »


Finally, about reading:  When I purchased our last ranch, I ordered literature from the state game and fish commission about natural plants for cattle and wildlife.  I wanted to know what to plant.  Three different publications said before planting to try fallow plowing.  Fallow plowing is simply deep plowing land, eight-inches or deeper and leaving it alone.  I used a chisel plow and broke up about 10-inches of soil and left the land in large clumps of soil.  By doing this the sun shines deeper into the soil and helps to germinate seeds that may be DECADES old.  The first year after fallow plowing there was an abundance of sunflowers, side oats gramma, native bluestem, verbena and many other native weeds and grasses.  I continue to fallow plow my land every two years and the forage for cattle, bees and birds gets better and better. 

If you have some vacant land you might try this.  It has been an economical and foraging success.  I fallow plow half of my 200 acres of pasture each year in January or February. 

My land had been over grazed for decades, and the fallow plowing greatly enhanced the grazing for cattle.  In addition there is a lot of flowering weeds for the bees, and our native sunflowers draw the small song birds like honey does to bees.  The sunflowers are also good feed for dove, quail and turkey.  Maybe you can convince a neighbor with poor cattle pastures to try this.  It is an inexpensive way to improve pastures.  The cost per acre is probably less than $15.00.

lazy

That's very interesting, lazy.  If I understand correctly, its giving the land a chance to heal itself. 
On a smaller scale, that's why when digging or roto tilling all sorts of unexpected plant life germinates.
Why is it necessary to repeat plowing every couple of years?  Is that allowing the reseeding to take place?

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2016, 10:37:09 am »
Feed Your Brain First Part 3-The Honey Revolution Series by Dr. Ron Fessenden. 
I have had several of Dr. Fessenden's books for several years.  I heard him speak and was impressed at the time.  I heard him speak again this past weekend and  C:-) C:-) went off.  I got this book out again and am trying very hard to work his recommended practices into my life.
I have several health issues, that I won't go into, Dr. Ron claims can be improved on or stabilized with a daily intake of honey.  For me, 1 tablespoon in the morning and 2 tablespoons at night. 
So, yesterday was the start of my plan.  1 T. in the morning went fine.  Drank it in a cup of tea.  Drank 1 T. in a cup of tea before bed, fell asleep before I could consume the 2nd.  That was about 10:30pm.  I got up at 8am!  Best night's sleep in a long time!

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2016, 08:38:35 pm »
Saw this new publication on Amazon and so I ordered my own Christmas present.  100 Plants to Feed the Bees: Provide a Healthy Habitat to Help Pollinators Thrive by the Xerces Societywas just released.  So, I will post more when I read it. 

Offline Lburou

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Re: What I am currently reading
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2016, 11:06:42 pm »
I've been reading about bread, and dough handling this week.  Here is my first attempt at baguettes today:




A lot to learn here.  Next time, I'll score them before baking them for two minutes (I forgot) and won't use so much water spritz because it made the crust thicker than I/we like.  More crumb would be desirable as well.  Tomorrow I'll be baking some artisan bread.

Added:  My latest book is "Spell It Out" by David Crystal.  In the 6th Century, the Romans introduced their 23 letter alphabet  to write the 37 phonemes (sounds) of Anglo Saxon spoken in England at the time.  After 1066, the French ruled  England and introduced extra letters make spelling more in line with French spellings.  An interesting read.  David Crystal also wrote a book called "The Story of English in 100 Words", also a good read.


Lee_Burough