Author Topic: Alaska Bee Keeping  (Read 22882 times)

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Offline MudSongs

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #320 on: August 19, 2019, 08:24:47 am »
This is what two of my black-painted hives look like.  I think my bees would have benefited from this earlier in the summer.



I painted them near the end of the day when the bees were done foraging.  The paint dried overnight.  Painting hives while bees are in them is not something I'd normally consider, but I was careful not to leak any paint into the hives or paint any of the supers together.

This feels like one of the most out-there things I've done with my bees.  Painting the hives while the bees are in them and using black paint.  I'm pretty sure I'm the first beekeeper in Newfoundland to do this.  I'm a pioneer.

I'm curious to see how it plays out.  If it doesn't work, I still have plenty of green paint.  But so far, just laying my hands on the black supers, compared to the green supers, I can feel the difference in the heat.  If I can feel it, I assume the bees can too.  I hope it helps.
- Phillip Cairns
Isle of Newfoundland
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Offline yukonjeff

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #321 on: September 01, 2019, 11:58:04 pm »
Looks Good. And yes you can feel the warmth on the face of a black painted hive on a winter day too.

PS I have painted with the bees inside too   :)

Offline MudSongs

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #322 on: September 08, 2019, 12:23:58 pm »
With a thermal imaging camera, I measured the difference between deeps painted black and deeps painted my usual dark green.  The surface of the black deeps was about 5°C warmer than the ones painted dark green, measurements taken in direct sunlight with hives full of bees.

Not sure how much warmer that is in the Fahrenheit scale.  But if the surface temperature of the green deep was 40°C and the black one was 45°C (which are the ballpark measurements I got), in Fahrenheit that would be 105°F and 113°F.

I don't know how much of that extra warmth translates into the hive, but I'll take it.
- Phillip Cairns
Isle of Newfoundland
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Offline yukonjeff

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #323 on: September 21, 2019, 03:08:36 pm »
That's a interesting experiment with the heat imager. Thanks for posting the results. I always thought it was a bout a 5 degree difference. I notice they fly on cooler days in the black painted hives. Than they did when they were painted white.

Also don't forget to paint the bottom board and entrance reducer, it helps melt the snow and ice from the entrance in winter.

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #324 on: September 22, 2019, 10:28:02 am »
I notice they fly on cooler days in the black painted hives. Than they did when they were painted white.


That is the reason we don't wrap hives here in Kansas.  It usually doesn't get cold enough here to do that winter prep. The bees fly out and chill then drop to the ground.  It's a false sense of temperature.  I always place a wind break, if there isn't a natural windbreak, between the hives and the North wind.

Offline yukonjeff

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #325 on: September 22, 2019, 02:02:06 pm »
BD I believe those bees your seeing spiral down after leaving the hive are the dead walking, and going to die anyway. I don't worry about them, and just hope my cluster is big enough to last until spring. I think the wraps save them stores and help keep the wind out.

Offline yukonjeff

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #326 on: September 25, 2019, 02:02:00 am »
I thought my bees were bringing in pollen, but nothing blooming after several hard freezes last week. Turns out they are bringing in mold from the underside of the Fireweed leaves.







Getting things set up for winter.
Here is my first mated queen I made here. I hope she makes it.



Got them fed up



Pollen patties on.



I have to treat yet, I don't think I have mites anymore, but will hit them with OAV and see what drops.

Offline yukonjeff

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #327 on: October 29, 2019, 12:50:23 am »


Well I did two rounds of OAV and had a mite drop of 50 each treatment, So even though my four hives, were from one hive that was treated with MAQs and two rounds of OAV last year, and the year before, still has mites. All four do. I might try and get in another round of OAV yet.

I have my quilt boxes, and sugar bricks on, and wrapped.



This is my first mated NUC. they are a little small, she didn't start laying until the last week in August when my other hives were already shutting down.



Good luck to everyone wintering their bees.

Offline MudSongs

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #328 on: July 17, 2020, 10:51:50 am »
I may be the only person on the Isle of Newfoundland who pants their hives black, but I'm doing it, along with switching to all-mediums, and so far so good.  I've posted the details here for anyone who might be interested:

https://mudsongs.org/black-hives/

Next spring will be the final test, to see how well the bees come through winter without wrap and only black pant.  I didn't wrap my black hives this past winter and it seemed to work out okay, but it's hard to judge from just one season because every season is different.

Gotta say, though, I love the switch to all mediums. I wish I'd done it when I started beekeeping.  We'll see how that plays out too.  This is my first summer with mediums.
- Phillip Cairns
Isle of Newfoundland

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #329 on: July 17, 2020, 03:12:19 pm »
Keep us posted, Mudsongs. 
Sounds interesting.

Offline Zweefer

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Re: Alaska Bee Keeping
« Reply #330 on: July 18, 2020, 09:04:03 am »
Great to hear from you MudSongs! 
I too made the switch to all mediums a number of years ago, and haven’t looked back! 
Now the trick is getting rid of your deeps so you aren’t tempted to use them.
Keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.
Henry David Thoreau