Author Topic: Processing large quantities of beeswax  (Read 261 times)

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Offline TheFuzz

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Processing large quantities of beeswax
« on: January 08, 2020, 11:26:20 pm »
I have about a dozen buckets worth full of unprocessed beeswax. My plan was to process it all via a solar wax melter, but I've found that, with the amount of beeswax I have, it'll simply take too many years to process it all this way.

I had some wax moth in some of these buckets awhile back, so I melted down all that wax, and sieved it into a bucket using an old t-shirt. I took a photo of one of these buckets it's the first photo:

https://imgur.com/a/J9dEdLg

The wax is now stuck to the sides and I'm not sure how to actually get the wax out of the bucket. Note that it's also got mold growing on it. I have three buckets like this. The rest of the buckets are the leftovers from when I used to do crush and strain.

Can any of you suggest the best way for me to go about processing all of this wax? I'd like to turn it all into uniform size blocks, maybe 0.5 or 1 KG rectangles. I figure I'll have to buy some things for doing this as I've had the misfortune of discovering everything I use to process wax becomes ruined.

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Processing large quantities of beeswax
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2020, 05:00:42 pm »
Is that solid beeswax, Fuzz?  You may have to cut the bucket off to release the wax.  I have used a coping saw to cut buckets before.  I think it is going to be difficult, but can you set that bucket down in a large tub full of very hot water?  If you can melt the outer edge of the wax, you might be able to slide it out.  It will probably be messy too.  Beeswax has a melting point of 62-62 C. or 144 - 147 F.  I would then try to work in smaller portions, remelt it, strain it again, and pour into your molds.
Some beekeepers wash their wax using hot water.  When it cools, the wax will float to the top leaving the water and sludge in the bottom.  To release the wax from the bucket, all you have to do is press down on one side of the wax.
What ever you choose to pour your clean wax into, make sure it is flexible.  If it isn't flexible, make sure that you can pop it in the freezer so that it can shrink enough to release.

Online iddee

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Re: Processing large quantities of beeswax
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2020, 06:52:42 pm »
Turn the bucket upside down and heat it with a hair dryer.
“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
― Shel Silverstein

Offline TheFuzz

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Re: Processing large quantities of beeswax
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2020, 07:28:11 am »
It is solid beeswax. I could melt it by putting the bucket in my car, it'll get quite hot in the Australian summer, I could give that a try.

Could a cake baking tray be suitable to pour the wax into?

Online iddee

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Re: Processing large quantities of beeswax
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2020, 08:46:09 am »
The best way is to get it out of the bucket, melt and strain it until it is clean, then get or make one of these and a few molds the size you want.

“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
― Shel Silverstein