Author Topic: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup  (Read 79 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jen

  • Gold Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 9676
  • Thanked: 183 times
  • Gender: Female
  • Location: Upper California
Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« on: June 28, 2020, 01:31:21 am »
Back when I got started on this forum, there was some good discussion on feeding bees high fructose corn syrup. What is the current info on this subject? A friend of mine is feeding his bees a product from the local Grange, here is the label of ingredients.


There Is Peace In The Queendom

Online iddee

  • Administrator
  • Gold Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 5697
  • Thanked: 289 times
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Sophia, N. C.
Re: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2020, 06:07:54 am »
At 15.00 a gallon, I wouldn't worry about quality. Sugar water is about 2.00 a gallon or less and is much better.
I would leave that junk on the shelf.


https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=feedlq-103
“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
― Shel Silverstein

Offline Bakersdozen

  • Global Moderator
  • Gold Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 3544
  • Thanked: 300 times
  • Gender: Female
  • Location: Olathe, Kansas
Re: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2020, 10:27:53 am »
 :o  It was listed at $27 a gallon on Amazon!
iddee's link shows the label is Harvest Lane Honey.  If that is the brand name on the HFCS you have shown, I have a problem with the quality of their products.  There is a great Mom & Pop hardware store with a fantastic reputation, but they carry this brand of bee equipment.  Our local bee club has been working with them to make a connection with another local organization that produces bee equipment made by military veterans.  Many products, in the Harvest Lane Honey line, are simply useless, poor quality, and expensive. Only and experienced beekeeper would know that. 
The product in your picture contains Sodium Laurel Sulfate.  That's the ingredient found in many cleaning and personal care products.  That's what contributes to foaming and bubbles.  My son has to use toothpaste that is Sodium Laurel Sulfate free because it will cause sores in his mouth.  No thanks.
Sorry for the Sunday morning sermon.  O:-)
I agree with iddee.

Offline Zweefer

  • Administrator
  • Gold Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 1212
  • Thanked: 62 times
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Eau Claire WI
Re: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2020, 12:21:48 am »
preach on sister! 
I have no issue with feeding corn syrup to the bees, what I take issue with is that price! 
I personally just mix up sugar like bakers said. If you have a few hundred or thousand hives, then it may be cheaper to truck in the other as it becomes too time consuming to mix. 
Keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.
Henry David Thoreau

Online iddee

  • Administrator
  • Gold Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 5697
  • Thanked: 289 times
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Sophia, N. C.
Re: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2020, 06:13:13 am »
Beez Needz buys 67% sugar water  [2 to 1] in the plastic totes. "275 gallon" and sells it for about 4 dollars a gallon. I don't know what they pay for it, but a commercial keep could go that way and buy straight from the processor.
“Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”
― Shel Silverstein

Offline Zweefer

  • Administrator
  • Gold Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 1212
  • Thanked: 62 times
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Eau Claire WI
Re: Feeding Bees High Fructose Cornsyrup
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2020, 10:33:29 am »
Wasn’t aware that was even an option!
Keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.
Henry David Thoreau