Author Topic: Candle making question  (Read 660 times)

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Offline Bakersdozen

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Candle making question
« on: December 06, 2020, 12:26:57 pm »
I decided to try my hand a candle making.  I have years and years of wax stored that would make great candles.  I bought a metal mold for tapers but can't figure out how to thread the wick.  The hole is too small for my wicking needle to go through.  Any suggestions?  I bought a silicone mold that is working really well for making pinecone candles.  Did I make a mistake buying a metal mold?


Offline RAST

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2020, 07:38:47 pm »
Drill it out.

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2020, 07:53:24 am »
Follow up:  I took a small nail and enlarged those tiny holes.  Now I can thread the wick through using a piece of wire with a loop on the end.
I have watched dozens of beeswax candle making videos and pick up tidbits of info from some, not all.  Some of them are down right dangerous. (Melting the wax in the microwave.)




Offline RAST

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2020, 07:57:54 am »
Pine cone looks good.
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Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2020, 09:42:37 am »
Thanks, RAST. 
Every taper has got a ridge down the side from the seam in the mold.  :sad:  I guess I will use a hair dryer and a knife to smooth that out?  I also need one of those devices that makes the bottom look nice and pretty.  It helps the ends fit in a candle holder.

The learning curve is steep!

Offline PappyRick

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2020, 09:54:06 am »
I agree with the learning curve B12.  I am still struggling with getting my wax nice and clean.  I melt the wax in water, then strain it through cheesecloth  into a container to remove the debris, but the bottom of the wax still have some "gunk" in it.  So, I struggle getting the wax pretty.

Offline Bakersdozen

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Re: Candle making question
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2020, 09:56:17 am »
I agree with the learning curve B12.  I am still struggling with getting my wax nice and clean.  I melt the wax in water, then strain it through cheesecloth  into a container to remove the debris, but the bottom of the wax still have some "gunk" in it.  So, I struggle getting the wax pretty.

This is the process I use.  There may be more efficient ways, but I am doing it on a very small scale.  I place my cappings in an old large stock pot and add water.  I heat until the cappings have melted and then I allow to cool completely.  The wax will form a disc on top of the water.  This disk, for me, is filled with debris.  Then I use a double boiler and place broken pieces of the disc in it to melt again.  Once melted, I then use an old sweat shirt, with the inside facing up, to strain the wax.  Unless the wax is from old, old comb, it strains beautifully and is ready to pour into candle molds.  I find that piece of sweatshirt is only good for one strain.  I know some people use paint strainers, but the old sweatshirt does such a good job and it's using something that would have gone in the trash.
Recently I read that beeswax is selling for about $1.00 per ounce.  While at a chain craft store this week, I priced beeswax blocks and they were $15.00 per pound. Our wax has value.
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